Author Topic: The first setting of the hatching season  (Read 1900 times)

John W Blehm

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The first setting of the hatching season
« on: December 30, 2020, 05:43:50 PM »
I'm using a cabinet setter incubator with 3 racks, so with chicken eggs that hatch every 21 days I set eggs weekly with 96 eggs per rack.  Since I know not all the eggs in the 1st setting will be fertile  and I have not one, but three empty racks to start with I decided to fill all three.  For this 1st setting of the year I usually collect eggs for two weeks, but collected for three weeks this time to make sure I had enough eggs to fill the incubator.  This past Monday I sat 288 eggs.  Next Monday when I'm ready to put in my 2nd setting I'll candle the eggs that have been incubating and toss those that haven't started developing.  If that doesn't free up the room I need for my 2nd & 3rd settings to go in I'll toss out started eggs with the poorest color, shape, size, etc.

Suki

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Re: The first setting of the hatching season
« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2020, 08:50:38 PM »
Lucky you.  I use a Brinsea 21 egg incubator :-)

Mike Gilbert

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Re: The first setting of the hatching season
« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2020, 08:57:38 AM »
That is a lot of eggs to set at one time unless you plan to sell chicks again.     Which varieties would you say are your best layers this time of year in both LF and bantams?
Mike Gilbert
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John W Blehm

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Re: The first setting of the hatching season
« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2020, 11:19:33 AM »
With the birds on 16 hours of light/day most are popping out an egg most on days.  The bantam silver hen just laid her 1st egg of the season on Tuesday.  She is about 3 years old now and one of the few hens I have.  The best layers are the pullets from my LF buff outcross and crossbreed coops.  They're putting out 6 to 7 eggs a week per pullet.  Even most of the bantam pullets in individual coops are laying 5 to 6 eggs per week.  In two or three months, when the artificial lighting is stopped they can take a break.
It was a lot to set, but only 98 of them will make it to the hatcher.  That should give me good hatch rate of the best of the best eggs.  I figured it doesn't cost any more to operate the setter whether I only fill one rack or all 3 and so I'm taking advantage of it.

John W Blehm

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Re: The first setting of the hatching season
« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2022, 07:38:56 PM »
I can't believe how much better they lay now that I have the light timer in the coop.   I'm only giving them 15 hours.   The Ameraucanas are outlaying the Chanteclers.

Mine are also on 15 hours of bright "warm" (on the Kelvin scale) LED light to duplicate daylight, but also I have a low watt LED in the barn that comes on about a half hour early to mimic "dawn" and it goes out about a half hour after the full light goes out to give them a period of "dusk".  The ideal is to not shock or stress the birds in the morning by going from total darkness to bright daylight and by offering a little night light before it is time for lights out at night gives the birds time to get a bedtime snack and find the roost before for the night. 

Laurie Ashley

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Re: The first setting of the hatching season
« Reply #5 on: October 25, 2023, 10:04:28 PM »
Can I ask for light suggestions? Are there specific light bars, bulbs, etc, or can something from Harbor Freight work?
 I'm turning my spare bedroom in the basement into an indoor chicken room.  My uppity snooty neighbor ( the one with the real obnoxiously loud coon hounds) complained to the city officials about my cockerels crowing too much.  I got a ticket for $1700 and told I had 10 days to comply with city ordinance of no roosters outside.  So.. they are coming inside :) 
I verified with animal control agent and city official that they can't do anything about my choice in house pet.  And hubby won't let me take over his garage lol.
So building indoor cooping and planning on setting up lights on timers. There is one very small window in that room, but it's not really enough light allowed in I feel. 

Mike Gilbert

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Re: The first setting of the hatching season
« Reply #6 on: October 26, 2023, 12:41:45 PM »
Can I ask for light suggestions? Are there specific light bars, bulbs, etc, or can something from Harbor Freight work?
 I'm turning my spare bedroom in the basement into an indoor chicken room.  My uppity snooty neighbor ( the one with the real obnoxiously loud coon hounds) complained to the city officials about my cockerels crowing too much.  I got a ticket for $1700 and told I had 10 days to comply with city ordinance of no roosters outside.  So.. they are coming inside :) 
I verified with animal control agent and city official that they can't do anything about my choice in house pet.  And hubby won't let me take over his garage lol.
So building indoor cooping and planning on setting up lights on timers. There is one very small window in that room, but it's not really enough light allowed in I feel.

Chickens make an awful lot of dust.  I hope you don't have heating/cooling return vents in that room.   What will you do about fresh air and dust control?
Mike Gilbert
1st John 5:11-13

Michael Muenks

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Re: The first setting of the hatching season
« Reply #7 on: October 26, 2023, 05:22:45 PM »
I like warm colored LED lights. The rope lights are especially helpful to use in tight spaces.

Laurie Ashley

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Re: The first setting of the hatching season
« Reply #8 on: October 30, 2023, 07:08:18 PM »
Chickens make an awful lot of dust.  I hope you don't have heating/cooling return vents in that room.   What will you do about fresh air and dust control?
So far, I've just been dusting, sweeping and moping daily. And there is a door to the outside on that room that I have been opening to bring shavings in, and feed bags, etc.  It's only the boys that were brought inside.  It's what has to be done, at least for the time being.  Until we can make the big move up to property in Michigan in a couple years.