Author Topic: Molting  (Read 98 times)

Michael Muenks

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Molting
« on: September 30, 2021, 09:42:34 AM »

Mike Gilbert

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Re: Molting
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2021, 10:59:15 AM »
Good article Michael, thanks for posting.    Would you care to share this on our MeWe forum or mind if I do?
Mike Gilbert
1st John 5:11-13

Michael Muenks

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Re: Molting
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2021, 11:15:19 AM »

Kalin McClure

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Re: Molting
« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2021, 02:10:56 PM »
Very interesting!  I think the idea of encouraging 15-20% weight loss via a less energy-dense feed is especially intriguing.  I had always read that feed during molt should be very energy-dense in order to pump the brakes on weight loss during molt… the idea being that increased energy demand of growing new feathers coupled with them being off their feed would have them losing weight regardless.  But perhaps the “crash diet” method helps shorten the duration of the molt.

On a related note, I wonder if feather quality is affected? 
I didn’t get a chance to watch the video all the way through, so they may have touched on that.

Justin Snyder

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Re: Molting
« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2021, 05:28:38 PM »
Kalin, Jeff goes into great detail on several podcasts that he has been on. The short answer is they are putting on way too much internal fat in the abdomen and you are killing them by not reducing the weight to eliminate the fat. The birds come out of molt healthier and lay more eggs during the second cycle than if they had the internal fat. Balancing the correct amino acids when the feathers start to grow back will give you better feather quality.
He restricts the nutrition for 45 days then back to layer feed with high protein.
« Last Edit: September 30, 2021, 05:31:00 PM by Justin Snyder »

Kalin McClure

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Re: Molting
« Reply #5 on: October 01, 2021, 01:12:16 PM »
Kalin, Jeff goes into great detail on several podcasts that he has been on..

I’ll have to listen to some!  I’ve never been big on podcasts but sounds like I need to
bite the bullet.

Michael Muenks

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Re: Molting
« Reply #6 on: October 01, 2021, 08:36:29 PM »
Kalin,

I have been applying the guidance of Jeff Mattocks for almost a year. I wasn't a believer on the reducing weight during molt until I had some hens and pullets processed after molt and discovered tons of yellow body fat that Jeff describes. I'm planning my molt to start October 23rd and I have my molt feed sourced.

I now have grit and oyster shell freely available, use a supplement, love to use peat moss as a bedding, feed ration in a trough once a day, use lots of whole oats, and measure feed. I'm really very happy with the direction things are heading using what I've learned from Jeff Mattocks.

The weirdest thing . . . I now look the birds poop all the time!

« Last Edit: October 01, 2021, 08:55:29 PM by Michael Muenks »

Kalin McClure

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Re: Molting
« Reply #7 on: October 02, 2021, 09:07:24 AM »
Michael,

I’d love to hear your thoughts and feedback after this molt!

I’m not set up to do a managed molt currently; too many mixed ages in the same pens. I’m knee deep in molt already as it is.  But it’s something I’d consider for next year.  I think for this year I’m going to do more weighing of birds to try to get some data on how much weight they’re losing naturally, and try to record some start/end dates.

Michael Muenks

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Re: Molting
« Reply #8 on: October 02, 2021, 02:08:09 PM »
I completely understand. You might read a bit of Jeff Mattocks information about grower ration, molting ration, and holding ration. There might be a happy medium place in there that will work for you in general.

I will update on how things go. I'm holding a couple hens that I plan to cull until after the molt to see there start and end weight. I plan to process them to see how much of the bad fat was left in them.

Justin Snyder

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Re: Molting
« Reply #9 on: October 13, 2021, 04:52:52 PM »
use lots of whole oats, and measure feed.
After listening to a podcast featuring Jeff where he said NO to whole oats that they all need processed I have been putting them in the food processor for 30 seconds to break them up a before I mix them in the feed. Measuring the feed and only feeding the 4 ounces per day has really helped with the wild birds and mice also.

Michael Muenks

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Re: Molting
« Reply #10 on: October 14, 2021, 09:19:19 AM »
Thanks for sharing Justin! I'm a bit behind on listening to the different podcasts Jeff participates in. I've read information and listen to podcasts where Jeff Mattocks has gone both ways on the subject of whole oats verses ground oats depending on the context. Since he is very much a scientist, it makes sense to me that his view on oats will develop over time and I take to heart his latest findings and recommendations. I can see that ground would be more efficient from a digestive point of view, especially if being feed as a very high percent of a ration. I have been keeping whole oats at no more than 1/3 which has worked for me, but I can see if I make the jump to a higher percent that grinding would be necessary. Now I need to add the grinder to the Christmas list!

Don't forget feed grit!

Justin Snyder

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Re: Molting
« Reply #11 on: October 14, 2021, 09:19:31 PM »
Right, he cracks me up when he talks grit. Not feeding grit is like giving me a steak but no fork or knife.

I just recently became aware of Jeff. I searched out all of the podcasts I could find and ordered the newest edition of his book. The book says no more than 15% by weight for oats. This fits in with what he has said in the podcasts this summer. Anything over that and you have to add digestive enzymes. I have started measuring my feed like he suggests and quit buying old feed. It has helped reduce the rodent and wild bird populations around my coops so that is a huge bonus.

Michael Muenks

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Re: Molting
« Reply #12 on: October 14, 2021, 09:46:14 PM »
Justin,

I'm right at a year into following Jeff's recommendations. It is amazing how waste goes down by measuring and using grit. I'm still waiting for a couple of the bantams to explode from the Fertrell supplement. I know folks think I'm nuts, but I'm a believer. I have seen 6 year old birds become productive again and act like pullets and cockerels.

Michael

Justin Snyder

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Re: Molting
« Reply #13 on: October 15, 2021, 10:07:26 PM »
Michael,
I just started feeding it to my birds about a month ago. Waiting to see how the grow outs look this next spring.